Monthly Archives: August 2016

‘AN OCEAN IN A CUP’ BY STEPHEN TENORIO JR.

‘An Ocean In a Cup’ is Stephen Tenorio Jr.’s debut novel. It is set in the Marianas in the late 1890s and focuses on the experiences of an islander boy.

AN OCEAN IN A CUP

Summary

Tomas, a very gifted young man, makes a living delivering goods throughout the island of Guam. Together with his karabao he travels from village to village, fulfilling his duties like a responsible adult he after all is.

But Tomas’s life is untroubled only on the surface. The boy is tormented by an inexplicable sickness that slowly weakens his body and mind. With each passing day the darkness that besets him becomes harder to withstand.

Review

Let me warn you right off the bat: ‘An Ocean In a Cup’ is not a light-hearted book you may enjoy on a lazy afternoon at home. It is a complex, multi-dimensional story that will require your undivided attention. Otherwise, you will most likely get lost in the thicket of the author’s words.

Yes, this is the trouble with so-called serious literature – it is not for everyone. Stephen Tenorio Jr.’s novel won’t let you escape. It won’t transport you to another world and it won’t let you live the lives of some made-up characters. It doesn’t offer fast-paced action that flows smoothly from one event to another. Actually, the narrative is terribly slow. But there is a good reason for that. Being full of symbolism and thick layers you have to peel away to get to the pure gold, it provokes critical thinking and paves the way for deeper reflection on human nature and the many facets of multiculturalism.

The author’s extensive exploration of the dynamics of small-island societies sheds light on how the past can affect the present and shape the characteristics of such close-knit communities. As Tenorio recalls the country’s colonial experience, he analyses interactions between individuals from different cultural backgrounds, creating an enthralling portrait of the relations among people in culturally diverse Guam.

The strong plot is supported by plausible and unbelievably well-developed characters. Tomas, the protagonist of the book, is the most intriguing leading figure you can imagine. On the surface, he is a kind of ideal young man: sincere, hard-working, talented. But there is more to him than meets the eye. Suffering from emotional distress, which may be seen as indicative of mental illness, he lives surrounded by darkness only some of us will be able to understand. He’s constantly fighting his demons, desperately trying to free himself from the clutches of his own existence.

Although Tomas is the focal point of the story, the author doesn’t concentrate exclusively on him. Secondary characters are no less interesting. They form a mixed bag of personalities, divergent in every possible way, whom you’ll either love or hate.

In addition to this extraordinary substance, ‘An Ocean In a Cup’ will give you another reason for admiration – Stephen Tenorio Jr.’s writing style. The novel is crafted in a beautiful manner reminiscent of some of the greatest names in literature. This is prose of the highest quality composed of elegance, unassuming lyricism, and sophisticated eloquence that will leave you completely in awe of the author’s talent.

No matter how many times you’ll read this book, you will always discover it anew. It is a real gem, and, as we all know, gems are priceless. So if you’re searching for something unusual, meaningful, and thought-provoking this title should be your choice.

MOST INTERESTING CHARACTERS IN PACIFIC LITERATURE (PART 1)

Simone, The Telesa Trilogy by Lani Wendt Young

Just imagine… An exuberant fa’afafine who is an absolute ideal of a best friend and who seems to always know what to say and do. Don’t you wish you had a person like this around you? Yes, Simone is…well…just shamazing!

Lani Wendt Young created a character who’s far more interesting and compelling than the protagonists of the novels, but – what’s important – doesn’t steal the whole spotlight. The bright and bubbly personality she bestowed upon him makes the occasionally serious story exude humour and Polynesian cheerfulness.

Materena, The Materena Mahi Trilogy by Célestine Hitiura Vaite

Materena is the real heroine of the trilogy. A devoted wife, an excellent mother, a star. She is, as teenagers would say, the coolest ever.

The author managed to develop a dynamic female character who is, first and foremost, a woman strong enough to fight for herself and do as she pleases. This powerful feminist voice is a reminder that you can never forget about your own needs; and that your dreams are just as important as everybody else’s.

Kiva, ‘Scar of the Bamboo Leaf’ by Sieni A.M.

The most fascinating people are the ones who have a story to tell; the ones who are not perfect (what does it mean to be perfect, anyway?); the ones who can teach us something. And because we usually want the novels to reflect the real world, the same goes for literary characters.

Kiva, the protagonist of Sieni A.M.’s book, instantly becomes your best friend. She isn’t flawless (although for me she is!), she has her struggles, and yet she is determined to lead a happy and meaningful life. She is a true role model every one of us – regardless of age – should look up to and at least try to emulate.

Tomas, ‘An Ocean In a Cup’ by Stephen Tenorio Jr.

Stephen Tenorio Jr’s literary debut, ‘An Ocean In a Cup’, is a wonderful example that it is indeed possible to create a multi-layered character who can not only attract but also hold readers’ attention.

Tomas is a leading figure of the book. Although at first he seems like an ordinary – extremely gifted, yes, nonetheless completely average – young man, you quickly realize there is more to his personality than what you see on the surface. The inexplicable darkness within him makes you contemplate psychological mechanisms that define human nature.

Uncle Kahana,  The Niuhi Shark Saga by Lehua Parker

In Middle Grade/YA genre characters are probably the most important element of the story. They may be an inspiring example for the youth; they may provide them with guidance; they may impart the words of wisdom. But most of all, they may entertain.

Uncle Kahana is a mysterious elder who knows more than he’s willing to show. Well versed in traditional knowledge, he represents ‘old Hawaii’, showing everyone that the ancient way of being is an integral part of the island life, and that indigenous culture simply must be respected.