Monthly Archives: February 2018


If you are Lehua Parker’s fan, you surely know about the two boxed sets that feature her novellas. What is more, you have probably already read them. Curious to find out what inspired Lehua to write the stories? Just read the interview.


Pasifika Tales: Why did you decide to take part in this project?

Lehua Parker: For the simplest of reasons: a friend asked me. Adrienne Monson is an author who writes paranormal romance. She asked if I’d be interested in writing five novellas based on classic fairy tales to go into boxed sets with five other authors. She had a publisher lined up who wanted wildly different genres. Novellas are about a third as long as novels, and so it seemed like something I could do around other projects.

PT: How big of a challenge was it for you?

LP: It was much harder than I anticipated. I’ve published short stories, plays, poetry, and novels; novellas are a different beast.  In ‘Nani’s Kiss’, I kept wanting to write either a much shorter or much longer story. To keep to the novella length, I had to gloss over a lot of background about the sci-fi setting and the Indian and Hawaiian cultural aspects. This required readers to do some heavy mental lifting to connect the dots – which they didn’t expect. Based on the book cover, it looked like all the stories would be fast, fluffy romances.

In ‘Rell Goes Hawaiian’, I made it a little easier on myself and the reader by setting the story in contemporary Hawaii and staying truer to the Cinderella fairy tale.

PT: Which novella was more fun to write?

LP: ‘Nani’s Kiss’ was fun because I had to do a lot of research about Indian Buddhist culture and had to imagine Polynesians voyaging through space. ‘Rell Goes Hawaiian’ was a blast because I got to revisit a world and characters I knew very well.  Originally, ‘Rell was set in Waikiki and she was a nanny for a rich family on vacation. But no matter how hard I tried, I couldn’t get into that story. Finally, I gave myself permission to reimagined it in Lauele Town with Uncle Kahana, Ilima, and the rest of the gang and added cultural conflicts, a homecoming, and Hawaiian mythology. That’s when the fun began.

PT: You did not forget about incorporating Hawaiian / Polynesian cultures into the stories. Was it important to you to stay ‘faithful’ to your roots?

LP: Yes. There are thousands of authors who write romances and reimagined fairy tales for western readers. I want to write stories that resonate with a Pasifika audience. Last week, I was back in Hawaii, swimming in the ocean, eating too much, and poking around libraries and bookstores. It was discouraging to see how few titles are published about the Pasifika experience for a Pasifika audience. I get fan email from kids who are reading the Niuhi Shark Saga in school who tell me how excited they are to read Hawaiian and Pidgin words and to see characters just like people they know. So rather than write the same kind of story a thousand other authors are publishing, I try to write what’s in my heart, natoos, Poliahu’s house, and all.

PT: As you’ve mentioned, ‘Rell Goes Hawaiian’ is set in Lauele Town – a place known from the Niuhi Shark Saga. Why did you choose this particular setting?

LP: Firstly, because I wanted to write a new story for fans of the Niuhi series that continued a little bit after ‘One Truth, No Lie’.  Secondly, land ownership is a cultural concern in Hawaii. I only touched on this theme briefly in the Niuhi series when I explained why Lauele Town was so underdeveloped for such a highly desirable location on Oahu. As ‘Rell’ began to take shape, who controls, inherits, and uses land became a major theme. Lastly, I wanted to revisit beloved characters. Ilima as a fairy godmother simply cracked me up.

PT: Hawaiian culture is present in both novellas, but ‘Nani’s Kiss’ also draws from Indian culture. Where did this idea come from? 

LP: Before I wrote one word of ‘Nani’s Kiss’, I knew two things: the publisher wanted me to write a sci-fi story for the boxed set, and I wanted to somehow work Polynesian wayfinding into it. I needed an alien for the Beast. I was reading ‘Lincoln in the Bardo’ and started thinking about how the Bardo was a Buddhist place between death and rebirth. ‘What if’ questions poured out. Clashes between Hawaiian and Indian cultures and expectations, a galactic federation with debts owed, an ancient alien lifeform older than any other in existence, gender role expectations, alien communication dream sequences, Bardo sequences, reincarnation, a wicked Machiavellian stepmother – it was a lot to cram into a novella! I was so enamored by how the story was shaping up that I forgot it was supposed to be a retelling of ‘Beauty and the Beast’. In truth, it’s closer to a mash-up of Hawaiiana, Indian Buddhism, ‘Beauty and the Beast’, and ‘Sleeping Beauty’ plus a little too much late-night Diet Coke.

PT: I’d like to ask you about your plans. What can your fans expect from you in the near future?

LP: I have several irons in the fire. The one that’s closest to publication is the next Fractured series novella based on the ‘Little Mermaid’, which is about how Zader’s Niuhi mother Pua and human father Justin met.

Also in the writing queue is a middle grade novel with series potential about a critically ill Asian girl who escapes into a world where she’s an adventure hero called Roxie Sparkles.  Only she’s not. Another is a story about a part-Hawaiian teenage girl who comes to her grandmother’s house in Lauele because her father is in the military and on assignment to the Middle East. She discovers she can see all the ghosts and Hawaiian gods—and they want her to solve their problems. This one is set during the high school years Zader is away from Lauele Town and has all the characters from the Niuhi series – Uncle Kahana, Ilima, Jay, Maka, and Char Siu.

PT: So there will be more stories related to the Niuhi Shark Saga. But will you also surprise us with something completely new?

LP: There are more MG/YA and adult stories related to the Niuhi Shark Saga and Lauele Town that I plan to write and others that are totally unrelated. It’s hard to say which will be available to readers first since acquisition editors and publishers follow the market and give priority to what they think will sell best.


‘Rell Goes Hawaiian’ is a novella penned by Lehua Parker. It’s a newly imagined version of ‘Cinderella’ set in Lauele Town, Hawaii. It is included in ‘Fractured Slipper’ (‘Fairy Tale Ink Book 2’).



When Rell comes to Hawaii with her stepmother, Regina, and two bratty and more-than-annoying stepsisters, she realizes it isn’t to celebrate her 18th birthday. Instead of having fun, she needs to sign papers, take care of her stepsiblings, and do whatever Regina tells her to do.

The girl’s life changes immeasurably when her stepsisters push the sacred aumakua stone into the saltwater pool at Piko Point. Suddenly, with a little help from a special wagging friend, Rell gets more that she has ever wished for.


A contemporary ‘Cinderella’ story set in tropical Hawaii? Why not! You would think that this clichéd theme couldn’t result in anything interesting. After all, we all know how the tale goes. But in this case, you may get slightly surprised.

First and foremost, this novella takes readers back to Lauele Town, so well-known from Lehua Parker’s Niuhi Shark Saga. You get the chance to catch up with the old characters – uncle Kahana, Ilima, Jerry Santos, Tuna to name a few – and get to know them better or see them in a different light. Bringing back individuals from previous novels is always a treat for loyal fans. Especially if the author makes sure to further develop their storylines or add some extra layers to their personalities. What has Jerry, the surfer who witnessed Jay’s accident in the ocean, been doing? Is uncle Kahana still the guiding spirit of local community? And what about Ilima? Could she act as a fairy godmother? Obviously, she could (in Lauele Town, anything is possible), but don’t expect her to be that I-am-here-to-make-your-dreams-come-true type of a godparent. She has her own hidden agenda. Plus, with four legs and a tail she just couldn’t be your ordinary fairy, could she?

Along with the old characters, a few new ones make an appearance. Typically for a fairy tale, there are heroes and villains – and in this case it is not hard to guess who is who. Rell and Regina, the two new introductions and main characters in this story, are plausible and decently crafted, but perhaps too obvious as ‘symbols’; they lack a little bit of substance. But let’s bear in mind this is a novella, so not everything can be achieved.

Now, while the overall plot is somewhat predictable, the specific scenes are not. There are quite a few surprises thrown in, and I have to say they really keep things interesting. Even though you can foresee the ending, you are not able to guess the sequence of events that lead to it. Add to this a tropical island setting, traditional Hawaiian folklore, and a Polynesian vibe, and you get the best Cinderella tale possible.

Reading this story is a pure pleasure. It is a very engaging and even more enjoyable piece of literature, chock-full of Aloha spirit and effortless wisdom, which make it perfect for children and adults alike. So visit Lauele Town; I promise, you won’t regret doing so.


‘Nani’s Kiss’ is a novella written by Lehua Parker. It’s a sci-fi story loosely based on ‘Beauty and the Beast’. It’s featured in a boxed eBook set called ‘Fractured Beauty’ (‘Fairy Tale Ink Book 1’).



Nani has always known that one day she will marry Arjun. Even though she doesn’t know him very well, even though she is not sure she really loves him, she understands this is her destiny. Their parents arranged it a long time ago and Nani must fulfill their wishes. If only it was so simple. Unfortunately, it isn’t.

Arjun is dying. Since he collapsed, he has been locked in stasis in a medi-mod. What if he doesn’t survive? What will happen to their future? Risking everything, Nani is desperate to bring her fiancé back to life.


Is it possible to write a futuristic story anchored in traditional cultures? You have to admit, it is no mean feat. Lehua Parker dared try to do just that. And I think it’s safe to say she has succeeded.

‘Nani’s Kiss’ is a sci-fiction version of ‘Beauty and the Beast’ (only the beast is not who you expect it is), which takes from Hawaiian and Indian cultures. It’s a rather unusual mix and one that can be easily ruined. But Lehua Parker managed to keep the right proportions of all the elements, thanks to which the novella makes an interesting read.

The storyline engages the reader right from the beginning, and as it evolves you become more and more curious as to what will happen next. The unforeseen twists and turns keep you riveted and don’t let you get bored even for a short while. However, they also require your undivided attention.

I have to warn you that this novella is not the easiest to read. If you want to follow the plot, you really have to concentrate on the words. There are a lot of fictional names of characters and places you may simply have trouble keeping in mind. They make the story slightly confusing, which for some readers may be a minor put off.

The characters themselves are incredibly well-built for such a short tale. They are believable, and we must remember that the novella takes place in the future, and easy to relate to. With their hopes, dreams, and fears, they are like ordinary human beings. And despite the fact that their backgrounds are not as clearly shown as we would all want, you get the feeling that you know their past quite well.

Now, although the story isn’t set in Hawaii, the local customs and practices are very noticeable. Especially the tradition of tattooing. But forget about permanent drawings here. In the world the author has created, nano-bot tattoos appear and then dissolve, only to reappear on a different part of a person’s body. The images they form reveal the intimate secrets of one’s heart and soul, and for a novice are impossible to hide.

The idea – a brilliant idea – of giving a futuristic twist to one of the oldest Polynesian traditions shows how the past can connect with the future. It also reminds us that some things in life should never be forgotten.

‘Nani’s Kiss’ is without a doubt a very interesting novella. The concept is truly fascinating, so I am positive you won’t feel let down when you give it a try. I definitely recommend it!