Tag Archives: Oceania

ULTIMATE PACIFIC ISLANDS BOOKS – TO BUY FOR A SERIOUS PASIFIKA AFICIONADO (PART 2)

‘The Pacific Islands: Environment and Society’ by Moshe Rapaport

Another very good reference book of the encyclopaedia kind that holds a lot of valuable information on the Pacific Islands. Pleasantly (and simply) written, it broaches all the important subjects every Pasifika lover may be interested in. Definitely worthy of your attention!

Bonus: Impressive illustrations, charts, and diagrams that explain the author’s words.

‘Food Culture in the Pacific Islands’ by Roger Haden

It is not a secret that Pacific cultures are food-oriented. This phenomenal publication makes a wonderful introduction to Polynesian, Micronesian, and Melanesian cuisines. Roger Haden not only familiarizes readers with the most popular local ingredients and dishes, but he also explains traditional methods of cooking and preservation techniques.

Bonus: Engaging chapters regarding food history and typical meals.

‘Architecture in the South Pacific: The Ocean of Islands’ by Jennifer Taylor, James Conner

Would you want to have a slice of heaven in your home? Although the authentic Pasifika style is so unique that it’s almost impossible to recreate, Jennifer Taylor and James Conner’s book may be a fantastic source of inspiration. But the authors aim not only to inspire but also to inform – the title is a brilliant study of local architecture, culture, and history.

Bonus: Striking colour photographs!

‘A History of the Pacific Islands’ by Steven Roger Fischer

There are quite a few good books on the history of the Blue Continent, but this one is probably ‘the most pleasant’ to read. It’s rather concise – not overloaded with unnecessary facts, dates, and information – and thus easily absorbed even by those people who are not fans of history.

Bonus: Chapters dedicated to genealogy of the Pacific peoples – immensely engaging.

‘The People of the Sea: Environment, Identity and History in Oceania’ by Paul D’Arcy

This is one of the most interesting books on Oceania ever written. It is focused entirely on the influence the Pacific Ocean has had on the islands’ history, culture, and everyday life. Few authors examine this subject in such detail, and I dare to say that Paul D’Arcy created a masterpiece.

Bonus: Captivating and highly explanatory narrative that presents a different dimension to Pacific Islands history.

ULTIMATE PACIFIC ISLANDS BOOKS – TO BUY FOR A SERIOUS PASIFIKA AFICIONADO (PART 1)

‘The Pacific Islands: An Encyclopedia’ by Brij V. Lal (editor),  Kate Fortune (editor)

This substantial volume is a must-have for those who are interested in the Blue Continent. Over 600 pages cover all the important topics – from geography and environment to history and politics to peoples and their culture. It’s a true mine of information you definitely want to have sitting on your bookshelf.

Bonus: Lots of photographs, illustrations, maps, and tables that enhance the written word.

‘Reach for Paradise: A Journey Among Pacific Islands’ by Andrew Rayner

Andrew Rayner’s memoir-cum-travelogue is probably the most beautiful book on the Pacific Islands ever written. It is a treasure, pure and simple. Not only does it guarantee an enjoyable and insightful reading experience, but it also delights visually. I can assure you, it will hold your attention from the very first to the very last page.

Bonus: Every single page of this title is one big bonus!

‘We Are the Ocean: Selected Works’ by Epeli Hau’ofa

When you think of great Pacific writers, Epeli Hau’ofa’s name immediately comes to your mind. ‘We Are the Ocean’ is a brilliant book if you want to get a taste of the man’s works. It’s a terrific – absolutely terrific – combination of essays, poems, lectures, and fiction that not only entertains but most of all educates.

Bonus: Chapters from Epeli Hau’ofa’s novel ‘Kisses in the Nederends’ – hilarious!

‘Arts of the Pacific Islands’ by Anne D’Alleva

Art constitutes such an important part of Pasifika lifestyles. For those who want to delve deeper into this subject, Anne D’Alleva’s publication is a must-read. It explains the significance of artistic craftsmanship in Polynesian, Micronesian, and Melanesian cultures in great detail, letting you understand the real meaning behind various forms of Oceanian art.

Bonus: Breathtaking photographs that are worth a thousand words.

‘Globalization and Culture Change in the Pacific Islands’ by Victoria S. Lockwood

Cultures around the world are constantly changing, and the Pacific Island nations are not immune to this fact. Edited by Victoria S. Lockwood volume sheds interesting light on globalization and the effects it has on the remote countries scattered around the great blue ocean. A really fine piece of immensely engaging literature!

Bonus: In-depth case studies that offer a closer look at the topics discussed in the book.

‘KISSES IN THE NEDERENDS’ BY EPELI HAU’OFA

‘Kisses in the Nederends’ is a novel penned by a Tongan-Fijian author, Epeli Hau’ofa. It is set on a fictional Pacific island named Tipota and tells the story of Oilei Bomboki and his painful and rather embarrassing problem.

KISSES IN THE NEDERENDS

Summary

One morning Oilei Bomboki, a much respected landowner and a very important man, wakes up with a terrible pain in his backside. Pain so excruciating that he has no choice but to seek immediate help.

In search of a cure Oilei visits various healers and doctors, none of whom seems to be able to relieve his agony. Desperate but not without hope, he finally learns to love his body as well as accept the situation he has found himself in.

Review

There is absolutely no doubt that Epeli Hau’ofa was – and always will be – one of the greatest Pacific writers. His talent, wit, and intellect were beyond superlatives. I dare say that only him could produce a book – an extraordinary book, may I add – about… an anus.

‘Kisses in the Nederends’ is not a novel for the faint-hearted. If you lack a sense of humour, if you’re a bit too prim and proper, or if you simply don’t like reading about other people’s arses, then you may want to choose some other title. If you, however, don’t mind a little crudeness, then you will enjoy this slim volume.

Although it may seem that this novel is predominantly about Oilei’s health issue, it is not. After all, why would anyone decide to write a story about an intimate part of the human’s body without giving it a deeper meaning? For fun? Well, Epeli Hau’ofa was too much of an author extraordinaire to do that. In his book, an anus constitutes a metaphor. He said in the interview with Subramani: ‘(…) it is a metaphor for society and for everything else I could think of’. I admit, it is a rather unusual metaphor, but one that certainly attracts attention.

It is not a secret that Pacific societies are full of taboos and prohibitions. Certain things aren’t even thought about, not to mention discussed publicly. An anus is a very apt representation of the Islanders’ (or anyone’s!) fears and avoidances. We can easily talk about our arms and legs, but somehow we aren’t so keen on chatting about the opening in our bottoms. As a reader you get the feeling that through Oilei’s story Epeli Hau’ofa wanted to show his fellow countrymen and people of Oceania that sometimes there is nothing to be afraid of; that not everything is bad and deserving of being despised. The protagonist of his story finally learns to love his anus; he learns to accept it as a beautiful part of his body. This is an obvious suggestion and a message for us all – whatever it is that you fear or loathe, get to know it first. And then, with time, maybe you will be able to change your attitude.

If you have read any of Epeli Hau’ofa’s books, you can imagine that this novel, too, is exceptionally well written. It is sharp, witty, comical. However – here’s the warning – some people may find it distasteful. The main character doesn’t mince his words, so you should be prepared for some foul language. But, this is exactly what makes the book raw and real.

‘Kisses in the Nederends’ is a very important title in the history of Pacific Literature. It is a must read. You may not like it, but you should – no, you have to – give it a try.